OPINION: Healthy eating woes

SNAPSHOT: Highland dancers entertaining the crowds at The Scots School's Highland Gathering on Sunday. Photo: CHRIS SEABROOK 031917cscots3

SNAPSHOT: Highland dancers entertaining the crowds at The Scots School's Highland Gathering on Sunday. Photo: CHRIS SEABROOK 031917cscots3

A FRIDGE full of healthy fruit and vegetables is something Parade always aspires to, but it doesn’t always happen.

Quite often, it also contains leftover Chinese food, wine, cheese, chocolate and all the treats in life that you simply have to have.

On an all-too-regular basis, Parade also finds the sodden, leaky and smelly leftovers of her attempts to have healthy fruit and veg.

You know, the kind that sits at the back of your fridge’s crisper. The ones that leak a little juice when you pick it up and wonder what it once was.

So, when Parade arrived at work on the weekend and turned over a fresh day in her Aunty Acid desk calendar, she had to have a little chuckle..

It read: “I’ve just bought a load of fruit and vegetables. Should I throw them away now or wait two weeks like I usually to.”

For Parade, it was nice to be reassured that she’s not the only one who does this on a regular basis.

Grit and grunt of a strongman

THERE certainly was a lot to see at The Scots School’s Highland Gathering on Sunday, but the addition of a strongman competition certainly caught Parade’s attention.

It was put on by Highland Muscle in the school’s main oval and ran right across the day.

The first event Parade came across was the ‘natural stone put’ – think regular shot put, but this one uses eight kilogram rocks.

Similar to regular shot put, the rock is also held close to the head before being thrown – the furthest throw is the winner.

Another event that caught Parade’s particular attention was the caber toss. This is not for the faint-hearted.

Competitors are tasked to pick up huge 14-foot (4.26 metre, 45kgs) or 15-foot (4.57m, 50kgs) metre long wooden poles, that look like telegraph poles, and throw them.

“The athlete must turn the caber 180 degrees, trying to have the end land as close as possible to 12 o’clock,” the official explanation of the sport explains.

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