Parade: One egg fools them all

SNAPSHOT: Machattie Park's fountain, rotunda and stunning gardens never fail to be great photo opportunities. Photo: PHIL BLATCH

SNAPSHOT: Machattie Park's fountain, rotunda and stunning gardens never fail to be great photo opportunities. Photo: PHIL BLATCH

LAST year, Parade shared her household’s Easter tradition – a mammoth egg hunt, despite there being no children around. 

The tradition continued on Sunday and, like last year, Parade’s significant other hid 60 eggs around the house.

As they were in a new house, recalling previous hiding spots would not help improve Parade’s hunting statistics. 

She went about the house and successfully found 54 eggs before having to enlist the help of the hider, one more than she did in 2015. 

But just like last year, Parade and her significant other could not find egg number 60 anywhere.

They spent more than half an hour retracing their steps and recounting the eggs, just to make sure they were in fact missing one.

Eventually, Parade’s significant other found it. 

Last year, it was under a heater, where Parade had actually found an egg earlier in the morning. 

This time around, it was hiding on a book shelf, where Parade had plucked two eggs from during her initial search of the guest bedroom. 

She is determined not to embarrass herself for a third time next Easter. 

Fun not over yet

IT isn’t long now before Bathurst’s children go back to school after a couple of well-deserved weeks away from their desks, but there is still plenty happening for children to enjoy. 

Bathurst Library has a manga and anime school holiday workshop on Thursday, which will be led by professional artist, illustrator, designer and author Matthew Lin.

This workshop costs $10 and needs to be booked. 

Bathurst PCYC is also offering holiday activities over the last few days of the break.

There is a schedule available at www.facebook.com/BathurstPCYC.

One activity Parade is sure kids will enjoy is the return of the LEGO models of Mount Panorama  – Wahluu.

The models, now at the Australian Fossil and Mineral Museum, give young people the chance to learn more about the iconic location and allow them to be creative by making pieces out of the LEGO bricks included with the exhibition. 

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