OPINION: Women’s totes messy

SNAPSHOT: This stunning sunrise photo was taken at Laffing Waters earlier this week by Western Advocate reader David Abernethy. 061317snap
SNAPSHOT: This stunning sunrise photo was taken at Laffing Waters earlier this week by Western Advocate reader David Abernethy. 061317snap

IF you’re wondering where all your lost hours are going, this could explain it all.

Parade receives many random things in her inbox each week, and this week was no different.

Apparently, Australian women spend 81 days in their lifetime searching for things in their handbags, a survey of 1488 women revealed.

The survey, conducted by Pilot Pen Australia, also showed that the majority (46.8 per cent) of women describe their bag as cluttered.

A further 31.5 per cent say their handbag is disorganised, with some (13.7 per cent) calling it downright chaotic.

In addition, the survey said most women (34.5 per cent) spend at least five minutes every day trying to find something in their handbag. This is the equivalent of 81 days in their lifetime.

A further 18.5 per cent say they spend at least 10 minutes every single day searching for something in their bag. This adds up to 162 days, or almost half a year, of scouring their bags.

And, lastly, if you’re wondering what us women keep in our handbags, well there were answers in the survey for that as well.

A wallet topped the list, according to the data survey, followed by a pen, smart phone and make up. Tweezers were last on the list at two per cent.

With this in mind, Parade may just go out this afternoon, tip out the contents of her handbag and do a bit of a clean out.

Doors open, come and take a look

IF you’ve always wanted to take a peek inside the Old Government Cottage, locate on Stanley Street near the corner of George Street, your change is coming up.

The Bathurst District Historical Society is holding two open days this month with the public invited to come along and take a look.

Old Government Cottage is a rare, intact example, of an early Bathurst home.

It is believed the cottage had been built in 1817 as the residence of the Commandant of the Bathurst Settlement.

The first open day is this Sunday, June 18 and then again the following Sunday, June 25. The cottage will be open from noon until 4pm.