Bathurst Regional Council considers agricultural land subdivision

THE number of lifestyle blocks in Bathurst is set to expand if a development application (DA) before Bathurst Regional Council is approved.

The DA is for the 8.91 hectare (22 acre) ‘Littlebourne’ property on O’Connell Road at Kelso.

The former pastoral property was established circa 1830 and previous subdivisions have limited the agricultural activity to orcharding and small-scale grazing.

The DA shows the property will be carved up into 17 lots ranging in size from 4000 square metres (0.4 hectares/0.98 acres) to the largest at 13,400 square metres (1.34 hectares/3.31 acres ) which will retain the original homestead.

Two new roads will be constructed within the subdivsion – one leading off Blue Ridge Drive while the other will be an internal no through road.

Primary access to each lot will be from direct frontage to Blue Ridge Drive or the new subdivision roads. At the finalisation of the development, no lots are proposed to have access to O’Connell Road.

The DA’s Statement of Environmental Effects said the subdivision of the land will “facilitate semi-rural lifestyle living opportunities”.

DEVELOPMENT: Proposed subdivision of 'Littlebourne' on O'Connell Road at Kelso. Plan: BATHURST REGIONAL COUNCIL

DEVELOPMENT: Proposed subdivision of 'Littlebourne' on O'Connell Road at Kelso. Plan: BATHURST REGIONAL COUNCIL

“An increase in population could lead to improved community facilities and services and additional agricultural, recreational and tourist employment opportunities within the LGA,” the report said.

Raine and Horne director Matt Clifton said there was buyer demand for larger, lifestyle blocks around Bathurst.

“It effectively joins onto the Blue Ridge Estate, it’ll have full services,” he said.

Mr Clifton said with the average new estate block in town being around 800-900 square metres, he expects these lots would be popular if approved by council.

“Blocks are getting smaller and people will want a bit of space for their stuff,” he said.

“I think they’ll be really well received, at the moment there’s nothing quite like it.”

HISTORICAL HOMESTEAD: The convict-built Littlebourne was constructed in 1835. Photo: CHRIS SEABROOK

HISTORICAL HOMESTEAD: The convict-built Littlebourne was constructed in 1835. Photo: CHRIS SEABROOK

One Agency owner Mitchell Bestwick agreed that there was demand for larger land blocks around Bathurst.

“We get a lot of inquiries from people wanting large blocks or houses on large blocks,” he said.

Mr Bestwick said he expects demand to purchase the land would be significant if the DA is approved by council.

“You could build the house, have a shed or a pool and have some space,” he said.

The size of lots in new land releases has become smaller, Mr Bestwick said, due to Bathurst’s increasing population and the need to fit in more people.

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