Western Sydney University Bathurst Clinical School's new intake

RURAL PLACEMENT: Fourth year Western Sydney University medical students with (back row, third from right) senior lecturer GP Dr Kam Wong and (front, far right) clinical dean associate professor Tim McCrossin. Photo: NADINE MORTON 071317nmstudents

RURAL PLACEMENT: Fourth year Western Sydney University medical students with (back row, third from right) senior lecturer GP Dr Kam Wong and (front, far right) clinical dean associate professor Tim McCrossin. Photo: NADINE MORTON 071317nmstudents

SIXTEEN student doctors have pulled on their gloves and gowns to commence a 12-month placement at Bathurst Hospital.

The fourth year Western Sydney University (WSU) students will undertake studies in paediatrics, surgery, medicine, oncology, critical care, general practice, mental health and indigenous health.

They will learn and work under the guidance of Bathurst’s general practitioners and specialists as part of the Rural Medical School Program.

Student doctor Zainab Khan (front row, far left in photo) would like to work in surgery at the end of her studies while Leilani Doorbinnia (middle row, second from left) is focused on critical care (emergency).

“This is the first time I’ve been away from home so it’s a bit of independence,” Ms Khan said of her decision to come to Bathurst Hospital for the placement.

“I heard about the one-on-one training [in Bathurst Hospital] that you don’t get at the bigger hospitals.

“There’s fewer doctors so we can be a bigger part of the team.”

Ms Doorbinnia chose to come to Bathurst for her placement because she believed being in a smaller hospital would give her a greater chance to learn.

“I’m really looking forward to learning how to be well resourced in the ED [emergency department],” she said.

WSU clinical dean associate professor Tim McCrossin said a number of students who participate in the 12-month Bathurst placement choose to come back to complete their internships.

“It is a program that is designed to bring students into a rural setting from a metro setting,” he said.

“While studying in the region, these students will get practical experience working in all areas of medicine ahead of their final exam this time next year.

“The students are very excited to become part of the community for the time they will be here.”

WSU rural program co-ordinator Jane Thompson said the Bathurst community had been very welcoming to the student doctors during the program’s eight years.

This Friday and Saturday, the student doctors will undertake health checks at the Mudgee Small Farm Field Days.

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