Bathurst's Nissan Leaf owners explain about their cars

POWERFUL: Nissan Leaf owners Jenna-Lee Hurst, of Kelso, and Lindsay Cox, of Eglinton, both use solar panels to charge their vehicle. 100617leaf
POWERFUL: Nissan Leaf owners Jenna-Lee Hurst, of Kelso, and Lindsay Cox, of Eglinton, both use solar panels to charge their vehicle. 100617leaf

THE initial outlay is significant, but the benefits are substantial when you own an electric car, according to two Bathurst drivers.

Mother-of-three Jenna-Lee Hurst, of Kelso, and Lindsay Cox, of Eglinton, both bought a fully-electric Nissan Leaf this year.

They showed off their vehicles at Bathurst Community Climate Action Network’s recent launch of a report that makes the case for electric vehicle car racing at Mount Panorama.

Ms Hurst and Mr Cox both charge their vehicles – which have a range of about 140 kilometres – twice a week.

They said not having to buy petrol was the most obvious saving, but the vehicles also require less ongoing maintenance because they don’t have a combustion engine.

“There are not as many moving parts,” Ms Hurst said.

She and her husband bought their 2012 model Nissan Leaf for $30,000.

“We have been thinking about it for a while, but it was a matter of finding one in our price range,” she said.

The Hursts use their Leaf as their second car, as does Mr Cox.

“It [the Leaf] is a town car. It’s a second car, not a primary car,” he said.

He said he had travelled nearly 4000 kilometres in his Leaf since April, saving about $400 in fuel.

Both drivers charge their vehicles using solar panels on their home, Mr Cox estimating it costs him about 50 cents to do so.

It takes about six hours for Ms Hurst’s Leaf to be fully charged using a 15amp wall socket she had installed in her garage, but the vehicle can be 80 per cent charged in about 20 minutes using three-phase power.

Both drivers said one of the vehicle’s greatest selling points is the fact it is silent.