CSU's engineering building has official opening

GREAT MOMENT: Member for Calare Andrew Gee and Charles Sturt University's Vice Chancellor professor Andrew Vann after unveiling the plaque for the new engineering building. Photo: RACHEL CHAMBERLAIN 101317rccsu
GREAT MOMENT: Member for Calare Andrew Gee and Charles Sturt University's Vice Chancellor professor Andrew Vann after unveiling the plaque for the new engineering building. Photo: RACHEL CHAMBERLAIN 101317rccsu

THE new engineering building at Charles Sturt University was given an official opening before dignitaries, staff and community members on Friday,

Although officially opened on Friday, the building was completed in 2016 and has been in operation for engineering students throughout 2017.

Vice Chancellor professor Andrew Vann, with the assistance of member for Calare Andrew Gee, formally opened the facility.

Professor Vann, who trained as a civil engineer and is the son of two engineers, said it was a very significant moment for the university and future engineers.

“We gather to celebrate another chapter in the growth of Charles Sturt University today with the official opening of this building,” he said.  

“This has been a very important investment made by the university in our regions and we hope the graduates will go well beyond Bathurst, in fact, they already are.”

Professor Vann said the building had been designed so it could be more than just a place of learning and actually be part of the educational process for engineers. 

It was also designed to meet the demands for entrepreneurial engineers, “who make a difference in their communities”.

Mr Gee addressed the room after Professor Vann’s comments and reiterated how important the facility would become not only to the university, but to regional NSW. 

“CSU, it’s about building country communities, that’s what it does,” he said.

“It doesn’t matter what faculty it is, dentistry, health services – it doesn’t matter – we know that a large proportion of CSU’s graduates actually end up in the country, living and working in the country, and building country communities.” 

“And that’s what is going to happen at this faculty as well. You’re going to have lots of students coming through this unique program, they’re going to get great practical experience with local firms.”

The engineering facility came at a cost of $14.3 million and was built by Joss Constructions.

It includes first class finishes and high end audio visual technology throughout the teaching, foyer and office spaces, which are utilised by the School of Engineering.