Work under way to fix some of Bathurst’s worst footpaths

PAVING THE WAY: Bathurst Regional Council staff hard at work this week upgrading  the footpath outside the George and Russell street entrance to Machattie Park. Photo: CHRIS SEABROOK 110817cpave1
PAVING THE WAY: Bathurst Regional Council staff hard at work this week upgrading the footpath outside the George and Russell street entrance to Machattie Park. Photo: CHRIS SEABROOK 110817cpave1

BATHURST Regional Council has begun the mammoth job of fixing some of the worst cracked and broken footpaths within the CBD.

Council has been under pressure in recent months to take action beyond spraying yellow paint along the raised edges of some of the worst affected areas.

Council’s director of engineering Darren Sturgiss said work crews had begun repairs at the first two sections of footpath on a long list.

“Footpath upgrades are currently being undertaken on the two opposite corners of George and Russell streets, adjacent to Machattie Park and Country Coffee,” he said.

“These upgrades are in addition to the recent work completed in front of the state office block.

“The next project will focus on improving the entrance into Martin Halpin Lane off Howick Street, near the Greater Bank.”

The issue of broken footpaths was put firmly on the council agenda in July when local man John Hollis used public question time to call on council to prepare a comprehensive plan detailing how it plans to tackle the problem across the city.

And it came to a head soon after when Bathurst woman Miriam Ledger shared her story about injuring herself after falling heavily on Howick Street.

Council has set aside $100,000 in the 2017-18 budget to begin repairs and Mr Sturgiss said local footpaths were always being monitored.

“A footpath inspection program is conducted every six months where defects are itemised and placed on a priority schedule,” he said.

“If members of the community would like to report any foothpaths or cycleways that need maintenance, please call council on 6333 6100 so they can be assessed and attended to.”