No red alert for cherry farm just yet after the big wet

STORMY WEATHER: Dale and Andrew Curran checking their cherry crop at Limekilns Cherry Farm. Photo: CHRIS SEABROOK 120517cherry3
STORMY WEATHER: Dale and Andrew Curran checking their cherry crop at Limekilns Cherry Farm. Photo: CHRIS SEABROOK 120517cherry3

DALE Curran saw half the average December rain total fall on Saturday alone, but the local cherry farmer says the big wet has had a minimal impact on her produce.

Ms Curran says almost half of Limekilns Cherry Farm’s produce had been sold on Saturday, limiting the rain’s impact.

The local cherry farm not only gets visitors from Bathurst, but often has people travel from further afield to pick their own cherries.

“We had some Vietnamese travellers visit on Saturday to pick their own cherries. Unfortunately, they got caught in the rain,” Ms Curran said.

The cherries yet to be picked at Limekilns Cherry Farm were affected slightly by the rain as some have begun to split or become squishy, ultimately affecting quality.

Ms Curran, who likes her produce to be fresh and chemical free, does not use preventative measures to keep the farm’s cherries dry. 

“Some farms use helicopters to keep their farms dry; it acts like a giant blowdryer,” she said.

Locals can expect steep increases in price if crops continue to be affected.

Limekilns Cherry Farm, at 2160 Limekilns Road, will be open on weekends from 10am until 4pm until December 17. 

Limekilns Cherry Farm is one of three cherry farms in Bathurst.