Rankin Street cottage to be turned into modern home

GOING AHEAD: Bathurst Regional Council will allow the cottage at 190 Rankin Street to be demolished and replaced by a modern home.
GOING AHEAD: Bathurst Regional Council will allow the cottage at 190 Rankin Street to be demolished and replaced by a modern home.

A TWO-BEDROOM 1960s cottage on Rankin Street will be demolished and replaced by a two-storey modern home despite objections from the Bathurst branch of the National Trust.

Bathurst Regional Council has approved plans to redevelop 190 Rankin Street which stands within the Bathurst Heritage Conservation Area but is not individually listed as a home of heritage significance.

The applicant, Damien Grant, also submitted a letter to council from NSW Heritage Council chairman Stephen Davies supporting the redevelopment, saying the existing cottage “does not make a contribution to the significance of the conservation area”.

But in a submission to council, National Trust branch chairman Iain McPherson argued there was no need to demolish the home.

“The current building is an integral part of the fabric of the heritage streetscape of Rankin Street which is a very important part of the Bathurst Heritage Conservation Area,” Mr McPherson states in the letter.

“This section of Rankin Street has a wide range of building styles. This early 1960s house contributes positively to the diversity of the landscape.”

The building is an integral part of the fabric of the heritage streetscape.

But a report to councillors by environmental, planning and building services director Neil Southorn recommended the redevelopment go ahead, with conditions.

Mr Southorn conceded the bulk and scale of the proposed new home were “large relative to its direct neighbours” and that documentation submitted with the application did not conclude the existing home was in poor condition or that the costs to make the dwelling habitable were “unreasonable”.

But he also noted the applicant had amended the original plans to address neighbours’ concerns.

“The Residential Infill Application submitted with the application demonstrates that the overall height of the proposed building is greater than the existing residences on the left and right sides,” he states in the report.

“(But) the applicant has amended the plans for the development in an attempt to address these concerns such that approval can be recommended, with conditions.”

Councillors voted to approve the development application, despite mayor Graeme Hanger and Monica Morse voting against the proposal.