Bathurst community benefits from Maddison Gorrell's project

WHEN seven-year-old Maddison Gorrell decided she wanted to help others late last year through a creative project, she never expected she would be so well supported.

She created bright, colourful, original artworks all for the price of a $2 donation.

All up, she raised almost $150 through the project and Parade has heard that with the proceeds Maddison purchased and donated presents to two Bathurst groups.

The first was Bathurst Hospital’s children’s ward where she donated 18 book and pencil packs.

Maddison also purchased and wrapped up a dozen additional presents which she donated to Hope Bathurst so they could be distributed at the Community Christmas Day lunch.

Parade would like to say a huge congratulations to you Maddison for a job very well done.

Just think how wonderful the world would be if we all did more things like this to help others.

Ouch! But what a way to fly away

LITTLE ONE: A grey-headed flying fox pup, with a dummy in its mouth, being cared for by a WIRES volunteer. Photo: PHIL BLATCH 010618pbbat4 (2)

LITTLE ONE: A grey-headed flying fox pup, with a dummy in its mouth, being cared for by a WIRES volunteer. Photo: PHIL BLATCH 010618pbbat4 (2)

THERE is no escaping that the current population of flying foxes in Machattie Park has captured the community’s attention – for good and bad reasons.

Parade has written a few stories about this colony since it arrived in town in early December and along the way has learnt a few facts, here’s one.

A WIRES bat co-ordinator told Parade that the way young bats, called pups, hang on when their mother flies is by her nipple.

Yep, the first thing Parade thought was ouch. But, nevertheless this is the way it is done.

And, if you’re wondering how this comes up in conversation – the answer was easy, Parade was asking why each pup in photos the Western Advocate ran earlier this week had a dummy-type looking thing in its mouth.

The WIRES co-ordinator said the bright object was indeed a dummy and was used for two reasons by carers.

The first reason was that it helped the pups feel more secure, the other she admits was there was less chance of the carer being bitten.

Call WIRES on 1300 094 737 if you see a native animal in distress.

SNAPSHOT: One of the ducks in Machattie Park taking a break by the water's edge. Photo: NADINE MORTON 011118nmsnap

SNAPSHOT: One of the ducks in Machattie Park taking a break by the water's edge. Photo: NADINE MORTON 011118nmsnap