NSW Police: Operation Merret, April 2018

IN OUR SIGHTS: Traffic and Highway Patrol Command Senior Constable Jason Marks  checking motorists' speed in Bathurst. Photo: PHIL BLATCH 122216pbspeed2
IN OUR SIGHTS: Traffic and Highway Patrol Command Senior Constable Jason Marks checking motorists' speed in Bathurst. Photo: PHIL BLATCH 122216pbspeed2

WITH more than 100 lives already lost on NSW roads already this year, Chifley Police District police are calling on all road users to slow down and travel safely ahead of the upcoming school holidays.

School holidays have commenced and run until Monday, April 30 and the state’s police will be out in force during the period for Operation Merret.

NSW Police say the unorthodox and proactive approach to road policing is aimed at educating and empowering the public to make the right decisions on the roads.

Chifley Police District Superintendent Paul McDonald said extra traffic is expected on the region’s roads during the next few days as families head off on holidays.

“Since the start of Operation Merret, police within the Chifley District have conducted almost 2000 random breath tests and numerous random drug tests,” he said.

“We have had 20 injury crashes and one fatal accident in the district.

“While most drivers are doing the right thing, there are still contributing factors such as fatigue, speed, complacency and the addition of various wildlife across the district.”

“We have had 20 injury crashes and one fatal accident in the district.

Chifley Police District Superintendent Paul McDonald

Superintendent McDonald has urged motorists to plan their trips appropriately, drive to the conditions and take care always when out on the road. 

“There will be an increased visible police presence across the entire region over the holiday period focusing on speed, fatigue, dangerous and impaired driving,” he said.

In four weeks since the start of Operation Merret, more than 30,000 infringements have been issued across the state for a variety of offences including speeding, not wearing a seatbelt, and using a mobile phone while driving.

NSW Police Force Deputy Commissioner Catherine Burn said all road users need to take personal responsibility and stay alert on NSW roads over the busy school holiday period.

“We began Operation Merret, an unorthodox approach to road safety in March this year, to help stem the number of lives lost on our roads,” she said.

“While we have seen a lot of positive feedback from the community, it is sad to see that the 30,000-plus infringements represent 30,000 people who made a decision to put themselves and others at risk over the past four weeks.

“With an increase in road users over the school holidays, we are urging all road users to be vigilant and take personal responsibility for their actions on the road.”