Bathurst's River Yarners highlight threatened species

LOOK AROUND: Wendy Alexander and Anastasia Freeman, from River Yarners, with some of the knitted animals. Photo: NADINE MORTON041218nmknit1
LOOK AROUND: Wendy Alexander and Anastasia Freeman, from River Yarners, with some of the knitted animals. Photo: NADINE MORTON041218nmknit1

THERE are 90 threatened species in the Bathurst region alone, and the River Yarners say they are keen to bring them to the community’s attention.

The dedicated knitters and crocheters call themselves a “craftivist” group and they were among scores of artisans who took part on the weekend’s Bathurst Heritage Trades Trail (BHTT).

Wendy Alexander said in an effort to raise awareness of the number of local threatened species she and other group members were knitting and crocheting each species.

A grey headed flying fox, regent honeyeater, trout cod and copper butterfly were among some of the knitted items they had on show at their stall during the BHTT.

Ms Alexander said the 90 threatened species include: plants, trees, fish, frogs, birds, invertebrates and mammals.

“Bathurst is an active city culturally and economically, but it’s also part of a complex natural environment that we don’t always see,” she said.

“It’s easy to forget to open our eyes to what is here, think about what was once was here, and think how each of us might support a rich, biodiverse future for Bathurst.”

Ms Alexander said the group’s initiative was a great way to raise awareness of the threatened species and help the community gain a deeper connection to the local environment.

It’s easy to forget to open our eyes to what is here, think about what was once was here, and think how each of us might support a rich, biodiverse future for Bathurst.

Wendy Alexander, River Yarners

“Thinking about Bathurst as part of a natural environment makes a walk along the river, in bushland and farming areas, or even around town more interesting when you have an understanding of what birds, plants or animals you might encounter,” she said.

The Rivers Yarners displayed a knitted and crocheted 80-metre replica of the Macquarie River (Wambool) in Bathurst’s Heritage Trades trail this weekend.

The River Yarners group started in 2015 in response to concerns surrounding the possible extraction of Macquarie River water for a proposed goal mine.

Members aim to redirect the yarn traditions of knitting and crochet to engage with Bathurst’s natural environments.