NAPLAN, 2018: Holy Family Primary School students | Video

TEST READY: Holy Family Primary School Year 5 students Maddi Honeyman, 10, Chloe Bennetts, 11, and Sebastian Prior, 10, say NAPLAN is nothing to be nervous about. Photo: NADINE MORTON 051618nmnaplan
TEST READY: Holy Family Primary School Year 5 students Maddi Honeyman, 10, Chloe Bennetts, 11, and Sebastian Prior, 10, say NAPLAN is nothing to be nervous about. Photo: NADINE MORTON 051618nmnaplan

MIDWAY through their NAPLAN testing, Year 5 students at Holy Family Primary School say there is nothing to be nervous about.

The National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) is held every second year across Australia and it puts students in years three, five, seven and nine to the test.

Students are assessed in – reading, writing, language conventions (spelling, grammar and punctuation) and numeracy.

Holy Family students Maddi Honeyman, 10, Chloe Bennetts, 11, and Sebastian Prior, 10, said the tests were nothing to be nervous about.

“I think it might just be because we’ve done it before so we know what it’s like,” Maddi said.

While Chloe said she “tried not to over think things” in the lead up to the three days of testing.

The final test this year will be numeracy on Thursday, which Sebastian said he was excited about as maths was his favourite subject.

“It’s just fun to see how problem solving works our and how many solutions you can get,” he said.

  • WATCH: Holy Family Primary School students discuss NAPLAN tests.

Principal Kevin Arrow said the tests were being taken by 110 students in Year 3 and 5 at the school this week.

“We find the school report we get from NAPLAN is very useful, we get a 90 page report for each year,” he said.

And, while reports of the students results help determine strengths and areas that need to be worked on, Mr Arrow said the school held a “low-key” approach to the test.

“Our approach is pretty low-key. School life is really busy, there’s heaps happening all the time,” he said.

“I think kids just see it as another learning activity.”

Nationally, NAPLAN is undergoing a three-year transition period as it moves online rather than pen and paper.

A spokesman from the NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA), which administers the tests in NSW, said schools participated in an online readiness test last year.

He said of the 3500 schools across NSW, around 550 are sitting all NAPLAN tests online for the first time this year, with more to transition online next year.

“In 2019, all 32 schools in the [Catholic] Diocese [of Bathurst] will do the online NAPLAN testing,” Mr Arrow said.