Rural Notebook | Barbie and a chat each day at Town and Country

MEAT AND GREET: Staff members and farmers were warm in front of the Town and Country Farm Support barbecue at lunchtime on Monday.
MEAT AND GREET: Staff members and farmers were warm in front of the Town and Country Farm Support barbecue at lunchtime on Monday.

VICKI Wilson and the friendly team at Town and Country Rural Supplies are putting on a free barbecue for farmers at the Town and Country premises every weekday between noon and 1pm.

This is a great support to worried producers who should appreciate a sausage, a yarn, and a bit of a laugh on a day when they have a half hour to spare.

Town and Country and Radio 2BS Gold have joined forces as “Thumbs Up for Farmers” and ask that any donations of cash or goods be dropped off at 109 George Street or 11 Kircaldy Street.

Some farmers, especially those with young families, could be really grateful for a bit of support and genuine friendship from caring friends.

Debt debacle

THE NSW Government has announced an increase in amounts of interest-free drought loans and several other support processes, but state support has never been unlimited.

Many producers are hoping for financial support for transporting fodder supplies across long distances and realistically this could come from Commonwealth coffers, but every cent that is committed to subsidies has to be borrowed from overseas.

The present situation makes me wonder how a Federal Treasury that was once debt-free (with credits of around $50 billion) could have ever got to where it is in 2018.

Waiting game

THE widespread sell-off of livestock across our district may be abating as both carriers and agents tell me that truck bookings for weekly stock sales are not busy.

There have been some decisions made that will mean that some businesses will take a few years to fully recover as a lot of good quality cows and young ewes have gone to the meat trade.

I’m told that a pen of skinny old ewes didn’t attract a bid at a local sale last week.

Meanwhile, the old-fashioned livestock dealer must be debating on what stage of the present situation he will start buying.

There are good buying opportunities in both sheep and cattle, but most country looks desolate.

Don’t risk it

A REMINDER that stock that are grazing on roadsides or moving from owners’ properties using public roads must have a Local Land Services permit and the owners must have $20 million of public risk insurance cover.

This is a NSW Government law and livestock owners can’t afford to risk being on the road without full insurance cover.

Deep thinking

WATER bore drillers are being kept busy across the state and results vary. Some regard the art of water divining as smoke and mirrors, while most of us would not start the drilling operation unless we employed a diviner to select a site.

Over my 60 years in the rural game, my family have employed drillers to sink seven bores: four at Perthville, one near Rockley Mount and two in the Mount Pleasant/Wentworth area.

These bores all found useful water - 100 gallons per hour up to 700gph, and depths ranged from 20 to 30 metres cased.

Two of the sites were selected by former Bathurst mayor Fred Fish, and five by his son John. They divined wells and bores over many areas.

HERE TO HELP: Some of the donated items for the 2BS Gold/Town and Country “Thumbs Up for Farmers” drought support program. Note the cartons of bottled spring water. Vicki also has containers and water available for anyone who requires it.

HERE TO HELP: Some of the donated items for the 2BS Gold/Town and Country “Thumbs Up for Farmers” drought support program. Note the cartons of bottled spring water. Vicki also has containers and water available for anyone who requires it.

Will be missed

JANET Drown of “Murraba”, O’Connell passed recently.

She is remembered as an active community member and a caring member of the staff of the Hamilton Street Pre-School in former years.

Janet’s husband Clive was president of the Bathurst Merino Association in some of its early years.

Former Oberon resident Jock Schrader also passed away last week. He was a successful farmer, regarded hotelier, and one of our district’s best footballers and cricketers.

Numbers game

OPERATORS of machinery, equipment, buses and ATVs that were made in China may be wise to save these contact details for future use.

This company claims to have the largest stock of parts for Chinese brands in Australia, and lists 32 makes (and more) in its storages.

Contacts are (08) 9452 3695 or 0426 418748; email parts@wwcm.com.au.

Please stick these numbers on your fridge as one day you’ll probably need them.

Wool report

THE wool market recovered some of last week’s losses as a combination of low auction volumes and lower Australian dollar sustained buyer interest.

Merino wool of 19 micron and broader saw good price rises while fine merinos drifted lower.

Fine crossbred wools were higher but the broader wools eased. The northern market indicator finished the week on 2059c/kg, up 2c/kg

Next week will see a smaller offering again with only 21,326 bales on offer nationwide.

Mark Horsburgh, TWG Landmark

Laugh lines

THE haughty lady admired a pure woollen jacket and the store owner told her it was $415.

So the lady found an identical item in another shop for $240 and bought it.

She returned to the first store and told the owner of the price difference and was told: “But madam, our jacket is guaranteed pure virgin Australian wool.”

“I don’t give a hoot what the sheep get up to at night, I just want value for my money,” our lady replied.

** 

A PLUMBER was called to a lovely home where a pipe was leaking.

He quickly fixed the fault and spent an hour flirting with the lady of the house.

Her husband disturbed the flirting when he rang to say he would be home for dinner and had to return to his office at 8pm.

His wife told the plumber that he would be welcome to visit her after 8pm.

“Sounds good to me, love,” our plumber replied, “but it’s double time after 6pm.”