Daffodil Day: What is Daffodil Day and where does the money go? | Video

SUPPORTING COMMUNITY: Cancer Council Western NSW community lead Ricky Puata and community programs co-ordinator Fiona Markwick. Photo: JUDE KEOGH 0821jkdaffy
SUPPORTING COMMUNITY: Cancer Council Western NSW community lead Ricky Puata and community programs co-ordinator Fiona Markwick. Photo: JUDE KEOGH 0821jkdaffy

IT may be the Cancer Council’s most iconic fundraiser of the year, but there is a very serious reason behind the existence Daffodil Day.

Now in its 32nd year, the event raised more than $140,000 in Western NSW during 2017 to help support people during and after treatment, as well as their carers.

“We fund around $15 million across many different research grants and our own in-house research as well,” Cancer Council Western NSW community lead Ricky Puata said.

Research and prevention are foremost in importance for the Cancer Council, community programs co-ordinator Fiona Markwick said.

“If we can nip it in the bud and work towards improving outcomes, not only for survivorship but how we’re looking at preventing things – what’s working, what’s not working, screening, all those sorts of things – then hopefully in the long run we won’t need to be supporting people with cancer. Wouldn’t that be the perfect world,” she said.

Cancer treatment has changed vastly over the years, largely thanks to research and developments, Ms Markwick said.

“Survivorship for a lot of the common cancers, like breast, prostate, those sorts of things, five years survival rates have increased so much in the last 20 years, it’s incredible,” she said.

We fund around $15 million across many different research grants and our own in-house research as well.

Cancer Council Western NSW community lead Ricky Puata

Mr Puata said research is not just about finding a cure, although that is the main goal, it is also about identifying cancer hot spots, tends and improving survivorship programs.

Funds raised through the sale of Daffodil Day merchandise will go to support the Cancer Council’s research, support programs, transport to treatment services, prevention and survivorship strategies.

Visit Daffodil Day online at www.daffodilday.com.au to find our more or make a donation.

Daffodil Day series

 TIME TO GET LIVING: David Fuller pops a party popper to celebrate the completion of his treatment for prostate cancer in 2017. Photo: SUPPLIED 081418fuller

TIME TO GET LIVING: David Fuller pops a party popper to celebrate the completion of his treatment for prostate cancer in 2017. Photo: SUPPLIED 081418fuller

Feel free to flick back through some of the earlier stories from our Daffodil Day series.