Options for treating termites

SUPER POWERS: Termites or white ants can destroy your home, but there are effective measures you can take to detect, destroy and then to reduce the risk of repeat attacks.
SUPER POWERS: Termites or white ants can destroy your home, but there are effective measures you can take to detect, destroy and then to reduce the risk of repeat attacks.

YOU lean on the door jamb and feel it give, or perhaps you buried the head of the vacuum cleaner straight through the skirting board?

Oh dear. It's definitely time to call the white ant exterminators. But don't despair, even if your window frames are hanging by a thread, all the affected chewed wood in your house is repairable.

But first, you have to ask the experts the extent of the damage and then how to deter the wood eating horrors from returning for another big chomp.

They maybe tiny as individuals, but they live in highly organised colonies of a million or more, with the power of super heroes to destroy your home.

The worst part is that one in four homes suffer attacks, and most people don't realise they have a problem until it is too late. Did you know most home and contents insurances don't cover any damage caused by termites?

Regular termite inspections every 12 months are your best defence and can help you detect any termite presence before they cause any significant damage.

Pest inspectors will carry out a visual timber inspection, which involves thorough inspection of internal areas, roof space, external areas, sub flooring, fences, sheds and any structures within 30 metres of the main building.

After the inspection they will let you know if any termites were found and if any treatment is necessary.

What you can do

Do not store untreated timber such as firewood up against the home. Keep them a good distance away and ideally store them off the ground on a metal frame.

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Termites need a ready water supply so find and repair any water leaks you may have inside or outside of your home. Make sure air conditioners, hot water systems or leaking taps are not dripping into the soil.

Ensure your home is well ventilated. This prevents moisture and is less attractive to termites.

Brick homes have weep holes to help with ventilation - keep them free from obstruction to prevent termite entry.

Ensure that the timber posts of deckings, pergolas, carports, gazebos etc are placed on steel stirrups to break timber contact with ground areas.

Homes with a concrete slab should ensure the exposed slab edge remains exposed as this forms part of the physical termite barrier.

If garden beds, soil areas etc are raised and covered, this can lead to undetected termite entry.

Clear any dead trees or old wood stumps from your yard. Check your foundations for cracks and other termite entry points and patch where necessary.

Before you buy a new home it is important to have the home thoroughly inspected for termites before you agree to go ahead with the sale.

If you notice termite mud tunnels on your brickwork, it may be an indication that you have termite activity in your home.

Don't break the tunnels open; they need to remain intact for effective eradication treatment.

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