Bathurst speeding tickets hit three-year high as drivers flout rules

CURBING THE ROAD TOLL: Highway Patrol officer Senior Constable Aaron Unicomb directing motorists near Learmonth Park on Monday. Photo: CHRIS SEABROOK 061118crbt1
CURBING THE ROAD TOLL: Highway Patrol officer Senior Constable Aaron Unicomb directing motorists near Learmonth Park on Monday. Photo: CHRIS SEABROOK 061118crbt1

HIGHWAY patrol officers in the Chifley Police District have issued almost 3900 speeding fines in the past 10 months as drivers continue to flout the rules and ignore police warnings to slow down.

Figures published by the Office of State Revenue, from July 2017 until April 2018, reveal a staggering 3839 speeding tickets have been issued in the Chifley Police District, raising $1,169,450.00 in revenue for the State Government.

The majority of drivers caught speeding in the last 10 months were exceeding the signposted speed limit by more than 10km per hour (2434 drivers), 627 drivers were caught exceeding the speed limit by more than 20km an hour, 97 were caught speeding more than 30km an hour and 20 drivers were caught exceeding the speed limit by more than 45km an hour over the posted speed limit.

The remaining  661 drivers were caught exceeding the speed limit by less than 10km an hour.

The latest figures represent a three year high, and alarmingly, come at a time when the road toll continues to rise.

Despite this, the latest figures are already 60 infringements higher then the previous 12 month period, with another two months yet to be counted.

By comparison, in the 12 months from July 2016 to June 30, 2017, 3779 speeding infringements were issued in Chifley LAC. The year prior to that is was 3587.

Sergeant Peter Foran, commander of Chifley’s Highway Patrol unit said the reality is if people continue to speed they will be caught.

He said the focus of highway patrol was to drive down the road toll and reduce serious injury crashes and fatalities, and he made no apologies for enforcing the law.

Sgt Foran even doing 10km an hour can be the difference between serious injury or death, or avoiding a crash all together.

“There is no such thing as safe speeding,” he said.

“Heaven forbid a child runs out in front of your car, that extra 10km an hour could mean the difference between pulling up or going straight over the child; if you’re doing 110km an hour and you hit a tree, the impact is going to be far greater.”

He police will continue to target areas over represented in serious injury and fatality crashes. “We’re there pulling drivers back into line.”