Rural Notebook | John Seaman

FUNDRAISER: Rural Aid CEO Charles Alder with some of the raffle items that were up for grabs at Saturday night's Black Tie and Boots Ball at Bathurst Goldfields. Photo: CHRIS SEABROOK
FUNDRAISER: Rural Aid CEO Charles Alder with some of the raffle items that were up for grabs at Saturday night's Black Tie and Boots Ball at Bathurst Goldfields. Photo: CHRIS SEABROOK

LAST Saturday’s Black Tie and Boots Ball at Bathurst Goldfields, Mount Panorama attracted a sellout crowd of 700 people and netted at least $150,000, which is earmarked for the immediate employment of a full-time rural counsellor for the Central Tablelands.

This has been a great effort by Grant and Chezzi Denyer and the band of hard-working helpers who have supported the fundraising efforts.

Meanwhile, useful rainfall across the district has put a few rungs of water in household tanks, laid some dust and raised many hopes.

This season may gradually improve with 15 millimetre falls through spring and we could see Fifty Shades of Green during September and October.

Useful rainfall has already given some producers the chance to work a paddock or two and topping the list of sowings is Moby barley. It has shot out of the fallow in less than a week in many cases.

There are a lot of livestock eyes watching every blade of green that appears, but many producers had hopes of making hay or silage from these late barley crops if seasonal conditions change a bit.

Tea for a few

AGRIWEST Bathurst manager Karen Miller will host a morning tea in the CRT store next Thursday, August 23 and invites all her customers and friends to simply call in for a cuppa, a yarn and a laugh.

From 9.30am ’til whenever, Karen, Rhyannah, Sandy, Clayton and Greg will be donning their aprons and will be happy to simply be our friends. 

These get-together opportunities are really valuable and country people should accept the invitation to call in.

Expo wrap-up

KIRBY McPhee has provided the following results from last weekend’s Ram Expo;

  • Junior Sheep Judging; Junior Section; 1 Dylan Grant; 2 James Dawson; 3 Ryan Williams-Davidson.
  • Senior High School Section; 1 Felicity Webb; 2 William Cox; 3 Hannah Maslin; 4 Lana Eastment.

At the same venue:

  • Chris Stapleton’s Capree Merino Stud was awarded best local display.
  • Darriwell Stud won the best display at the event.
  • Working sheepdogs sold well with tops at $5500, $5000, $4250 and $400.
TANGLED UP: A family of young snakes that were almost ready to face the world.

TANGLED UP: A family of young snakes that were almost ready to face the world.

Dogged pursuit

COMMITTEE members of the Turon Wild Dog Association are urging landholders in the Turon district to email or phone details of dog sightings or attacks to boxhill6@gmail.com or 6337 7751. 

These reports will illustrate the ongoing presence of marauding dogs and will assist in obtaining future funding for dog baits, cameras and dog trappers.

Reports tell of an alpaca killed by dogs near Duramana, 32 sheep killed in one night on a Bridle Track property and a bitch with six pups crossing the main road near Sallys Flat.

Fair occasion

BOOKINGS are now being taken for stallholders at the annual Perthville Village Fair on Saturday, September 8.

This event has grown into a “do not miss” fair on the Bathurst calendar and the new Perthville Hall is recognised as a top-notch venue.

Book early for your site on perthvillefair2795@gmail.com.

Let’s do lunch

THE Bathurst Merino Assocation’s Farmers Luncheon will take place at the Perthville Hall this Sunday, August 19. 

This is a free event for all farmers, friends and relatives.

The event will commence at noon and Clare Edwards from Local Land Services will take stock feed  samples for quality testing. 

Please bring two bucketfuls of either hay or grain. BYOG. RSVP necessary to Kirby McPhee for catering purposes. Phone 0401 402 351.

Going south

THE annual South West Slopes Stud Merino Field Day will present sheep for inspection from 57 registered studs at Harden Showground on Tuesday, September 4 with a 10am opening.

This group has operated for a quarter of a century and attracts around 1000 spectators and is supported by at least a dozen sponsors, nearly all of them local businesses.

The group has been strict in ensuring that all participating studs are actual studs and the group has shifted the venue about every third year.

Full details on www.swsmerinofieldday.com.

OVER TROUBLED WATER: This bridge was built to get woolly sheep to the woolshed at Boonoke, Conargo, during the 1931 floods.

OVER TROUBLED WATER: This bridge was built to get woolly sheep to the woolshed at Boonoke, Conargo, during the 1931 floods.

Diary dates

  • LOCAL Land Services drought information discussions: August 20, Blayney, 2.30-5.30pm; August 21, Hill End, 11am-2pm.
  • September 8, Perthville Village Fair.

Laugh lines

GEORGE continued to have health problems and eventually saw a big city specialist who promised to “have you back on your feet within three weeks”.

This proved to be true, when George had to sell the CRV to pay the specialist’s account.

**

“DOCTOR, are you sure I’m suffering from pneumonia?” she asked. “A friend of mine was being treated for pneumonia and died from typhus.”

“If I’m treating you for pneumonia, you’ll damn well die of pneumonia,” doctor replied.